Personal Thanatology

Personal Thanatology


It’s a Matter of Life and Death

 

Create a Personal Thanatology.  I’ll listen and encourage as you discover your unique perspective of what is important to you in Living Well & Dying Well.  I believe that when we talk more openly about death and dying, we are able to support and care for ourselves and one another more deeply.  It’s a simple message about a complex topic ~ talking about death and dying will improve the world we live in.

Thanatology

than · a · tol · o · gy                    [than-uh-tol-uh-jee]

n. the study of death and dying

Personal Thanatology

Reflect · Share · Live

v.   the lifelong discovery process where you (1) reflect on and explore your personal experiences, thoughts, memories, beliefs, stories and questions about death and dying; (2) share your ideas and stories with family, friends and acquaintances; then (3) live life based in what you value and brings you meaning ~ live your Philosophy of Life.

My goal in introducing this concept is to encourage people of all ages to be more comfortable with conversations about death and dying. Never to diminish the sadness and suffering of death, dying, grief, and loss, but to also be open to the love, peace, and support that are possible.

Today, remember a death experience you have had in your lifetime, anywhere from a childhood experience to a current experience of death, dying, grief, or loss.   Can you tell someone your story, can you listen to theirs?  Please remember to be gentle with yourself.  Compassion and non-judgment towards self and others is an essential ingredient in creating a

Personal Thanatology


Reflect · Share · Live

 

 

 

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  • Carol

    My grandmother died when I was 15 and my younger sister was 10. When my father told me of his mother’s death, he cried in my presence for the first time. In fact, initially I thought something much worse must have happened. Now that I am only 9 years younger than my Grandmother’s age at her death, I understand my father’s reaction.
    At the cemetery as we were leaving the car provided by the funeral home, my sister erupted in tears. I looked around for my Mom or Dad to take care of her, but they were lost in their own sorrow and grief. Looking back, I realize that was the moment I ‘left home,” the realization Joseph Campbell speaks of in the hero’s journey.